Research Blog

cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 

Research Blog

Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

With many parts of the country back in lockdown, medical care and support for cancer patients has reverted to the online space. This includes telehealth consultations, virtual support groups and the use of social media for peer-based support.

Despite the availability of this technology some of the emotional and mental well-being needs of these patients remain underexplored and underreported. Many have tried to address the void by .....

Read more...

Read more
0 0 76
Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

Dr Nathalie Bock and her team from the Queensland University of Technology have developed and validated a highly reproducible microtissue-engineered human construct in the lab that comprises osteocytic and osteoblastic cells (the cells responsible for the breakdown and formation of bone), with relevant protein expression and mineral content. The mature mineralized engineered tissue are cultured for up to 12 weeks. They then add metastatic prostate cancer cells to the mineralized microtissue. This model reproduces some of the cellular alterations seen ......

Read more...

Read more
0 0 86
Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

Copy of Don't Ignore The Pelvic FLoor.png

In medicine we often speak of prevention over cure. Professor Manish Patel at the University of Sydney found physiotherapist guided-pelvic floor muscle therapy (PG-PFMT) commenced 4 weeks before surgery may have a beneficial effect in reducing the duration and severity of incontinence2. Six weeks after prostatectomy, the intervention was associated with a lower degree of incontinence, with a significantly shorter duration to one and zero pad usage2. A meta-analysis which pools the results of several studies showed there is a 36% reduction of incontinence risk at 3 months after surgery if preoperative PFMT was performed3. Best outcome is achieved by .....

Read more...

Read more
0 0 215
Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

World-Continence-Week-Hero.jpg

 

The two major interventions for prostate cancer treatment are radiation and surgery (radical prostatectomy). Radiation very rarely results in leakage of urine, but may irritate the bladder and cause the urgent desire to urinate or the need to urinate with increased frequency. Surgery to remove the prostate most certainly can put one at risk of developing stress urinary incontinence. But what do we mean by stress? It does not mean incontinence brought on by a stressful incident. By stress we mean that any rise in the pressure inside the abdomen (such as during coughing, sneezing, defecating, positional shifts or exercise) may press down on the bladder and cause urine to leak. In rare instances, it may continuously leak on its own........

Read more...

Read more
0 0 121
Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

The last stop for erectile dysfunction treatment By Kalli Spencer

At this juncture in one’s prostate cancer journey, spirits may be down, frustration levels high and all hope for a more fulfilling sex life might seem lost. As per last week’s blog various erectile dysfunction medications, mechanical devices and self-injections may have been attempted and either deemed ineffective or failed.

There is one final option in the third tier of the treatment strategy and that is the insertion of a penile prosthetic or inflatable balloon placed within the penis. This procedure eliminates the need for any further medication and an erection depends on a device to occur.

For more information on sexual issues following prostate cancer treatment click the following link to access the PCFA resource - "Understanding Sexual Issues"

Read more...

Read more
0 0 263
Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

The purpose of this discussion is to explore the next level of medical treatment available. Assuming all medication based options (and even mechanical ones, such as vacuum erection devices) have failed: what’s next?

Read more...

Read more
0 0 185
Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

Research shows that how we think about our cancer and exercise may influence how much we exercise.

Research by Dr Siân Cole and the Psycho-oncology Research Team at the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness and Research Centre – Dr Gemma Skaczkowski and Prof Carlene Wilson - found that beliefs around exercise and cancer influence levels of exercise engagement in adults undergoing treatment for cancer.

Read more...

Read more
0 0 1,253
Jacqui_Schmitt
PCFA Staff

Receiving a diagnosis of prostate cancer is a major life stress for most men and their loved ones. Suddenly, the things that matter most seem threatened and it is very normal to experience a wide range of feelings and emotions.

Sometimes you may feel more distressed than at other times. Your feelings might be more intense while waiting for test results, making treatment decisions or just before commencing treatment. Side effects from treatment may also cause stress and upset. After treatment, you may worry about the cancer returning.

Today, there are over 220,000 men living after a diagnosis of prostate cancer. For most men the long-term outlook is very good - relative to the general population and considering other causes of death, 95% of men with prostate cancer will survive at least five years after diagnosis and 91% of men with prostate cancer will survive 10 years or more.

To help improve the lives of men living with prostate cancer, there is a need for more evidence-based strategies to help them manage the challenges of living with the disease. There is growing evidence that mindfulness is one strategy that can be used to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression associated with prostate cancer. 

 

Read more...

Read more
0 0 334
Jacqui_Schmitt
PCFA Staff

A world-first international prostate cancer quality of life study has been carried out by prostate cancer patients themselves. This is the largest study ever conducted by patients and its findings suggest that the different types of treatment for prostate cancer have differing impacts on quality of life. The study suggests that significant numbers of men struggle with urinary incontinence and sexual problems after treatment and that the impact on their quality of life may be greater than previously thought.  

Read more...

Read more
0 0 434
Research Blog

PCFA's Research Blog is regularly updated with articles, written in simple language, about recent and topical research in prostate cancer.

Labels