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Research Blog

PCFA_OC_Manager
Community Manager
Community Manager

In a highly competitive field, one of the more alarming side effects of hormone therapy is a gradual decline in cognitive function. This is not ideal for anyone but is particularly suboptimal for a career writer...

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PCFA_OC_Manager
Community Manager
Community Manager

Long-time readers of this column (stretching back, oh, what is it now, three weeks?) may recall that my own cancer self-care mantra is a simple one: Remember to take your M.E.D.S – Meditation, Exercise, Diet, Sleep. And that ticking each of these boxes each day, alongside conventional therapies, helps us withstand the rigours of cancer treatment and enhance quality of life...

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PCFA_OC_Manager
Community Manager
Community Manager

Any diagnosis of cancer can trigger a range of emotions and put one into an anxious state. These feelings may wax and wane through the various stages of the cancer journey and may persist. Wondering whether you have cancer; waiting for the results of diagnostic tests; going for treatment; dealing with the after effects of treatment and the fear of recurrence are just some of the potential triggers...

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PCFA_OC_Manager
Community Manager
Community Manager

I love food. I love eating it. I love cooking it. I love shopping for it. I love planning a meal or discovering a new restaurant.

So, since I was diagnosed, on July 7, 2015, with metastatic prostate cancer, one of the most vexed questions I’ve faced is a remarkably basic one. What should I eat?

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PCFA_OC_Manager
Community Manager
Community Manager

Imagine if there was a single treatment that neatly addressed many of the side effects of prostate cancer and its treatment. A silver bullet that could improve cardio-vascular health and bone density compromised by hormone therapy, reduce fatigue, improve mental health, that might slow cancer’s progress and even assist sexual function?

What is this miracle treatment, you might ask?

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PCFA_OC_Manager
Community Manager
Community Manager

Hi, I’m Tim.

Diagnosed with stage 4, metastatic prostate cancer on July 7, 2015. PSA 120. Gleason score 9. Lesions in right femur (thigh bone) and left seventh rib. Those of you with a maths brain might have already calculated that was nearly seven years ago. In that time, I’ve had early chemotherapy with concurrent hormone therapy, targeted radiation, ongoing intermittent hormone therapy, and have undergone a TURP...

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PCFA_OC_Manager
Community Manager
Community Manager

Did you know that more than half of Australian men over the age of 45 have some form of erectile dysfunction (ED)? The risk of ED increases with age, and for men with prostate cancer, it’s a major concern.

The good news is, there are a range of options for managing ED...

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PCFA_OC_Manager
Community Manager
Community Manager

Arousal Incontinence OC.jpg
“Sexual incontinence is a broad term that encompasses climacturia (urinary incontinence at the time of orgasm) and arousal incontinence (urinary incontinence at the time of physical or psychological arousal or both).”...

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PCFA_OC_Manager
Community Manager
Community Manager

In this article, we consider the risks of prostate cancer for people who have transitioned from being assigned male at birth to female in later life, who have a prostate gland which may predispose them to prostate cancer. This may be the case for people who were born with a prostate gland and have had gender affirming surgery (GAS), as well as those who identify as female, but have not had GAS.

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Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

Clinicians should not treat “all patients the same” and be aware of their own personal biases, cultural assumptions, and the need for cultural humility in providing care. Cultural humility requires “a lifelong commitment to self-reflection and self-critique, to redressing the power imbalances in the patient-physician dynamic, and to .....

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Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

Researchers have identified that those diagnosed with prostate cancer have several unmet needs1. While some patients require specialised support from healthcare workers to deal with treatment side effects and psychological distress, others may prefer peer support as a means to manage these supportive care needs.

Very few prostate cancer survivors seek help for their psychological distress. A survey of Australian’s who had been treated for localised prostate cancer determined that 20% of men with unmet supportive care needs sought help

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Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

Numerous hypotheses have been tested to find the cause of prostate cancer. An abundance of research has focused on various nutrients and diets as a potential risk factor. This blog will provide a brief update on contemporary research findings, will touch on the concept of prehabilitation and conclude with integrative clinical models to improve diet and nutrition for patients on various stages of their cancer journey.

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Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

With many parts of the country back in lockdown, medical care and support for cancer patients has reverted to the online space. This includes telehealth consultations, virtual support groups and the use of social media for peer-based support.

Despite the availability of this technology some of the emotional and mental well-being needs of these patients remain underexplored and underreported. Many have tried to address the void by .....

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Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

Research shows that how we think about our cancer and exercise may influence how much we exercise.

Research by Dr Siân Cole and the Psycho-oncology Research Team at the Olivia Newton-John Cancer Wellness and Research Centre – Dr Gemma Skaczkowski and Prof Carlene Wilson - found that beliefs around exercise and cancer influence levels of exercise engagement in adults undergoing treatment for cancer.

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Jacqui_Schmitt
PCFA Staff

Receiving a diagnosis of prostate cancer is a major life stress for most men and their loved ones. Suddenly, the things that matter most seem threatened and it is very normal to experience a wide range of feelings and emotions.

Sometimes you may feel more distressed than at other times. Your feelings might be more intense while waiting for test results, making treatment decisions or just before commencing treatment. Side effects from treatment may also cause stress and upset. After treatment, you may worry about the cancer returning.

Today, there are over 220,000 men living after a diagnosis of prostate cancer. For most men the long-term outlook is very good - relative to the general population and considering other causes of death, 95% of men with prostate cancer will survive at least five years after diagnosis and 91% of men with prostate cancer will survive 10 years or more.

To help improve the lives of men living with prostate cancer, there is a need for more evidence-based strategies to help them manage the challenges of living with the disease. There is growing evidence that mindfulness is one strategy that can be used to reduce symptoms of anxiety and depression associated with prostate cancer. 

 

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Chris_McNamara
Community Manager
Community Manager

If you’ve been diagnosed with prostate cancer, your overall health and fitness can impact your treatment options, as well as influencing how you physically recover from surgery and other types of therapy. Maintaining a healthy weight is key, a point backed up by new Australian research.

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Jacqui_Schmitt
PCFA Staff

A world-first international prostate cancer quality of life study has been carried out by prostate cancer patients themselves. This is the largest study ever conducted by patients and its findings suggest that the different types of treatment for prostate cancer have differing impacts on quality of life. The study suggests that significant numbers of men struggle with urinary incontinence and sexual problems after treatment and that the impact on their quality of life may be greater than previously thought.  

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Research Blog

PCFA's Research Blog is regularly updated with articles, written in simple language, about recent and topical research in prostate cancer.

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